anishinaabequay:

Jared Yazzie (Navajo).

anishinaabequay:

Jared Yazzie (Navajo).

kathleenjoy:

Pacific women rise up for a Free West Papua!'Our freedom as indigenous Māori and Pacific women in Aotearoa New Zealand is inextricably bound up with that of our Pacific West Papuan brothers and sisters.'- Oceania Interruptedhttp://urlmin.com/3hmy2Our mouths are adorned with the Morning Star flag as symbol of enforced West Papuan silence. Our hands are bound to symbolise the lack of freedoms experienced by West Papuan people. Our voices and movement are restricted to symbolise the lack of freedom of expression of political opinion, the lack of access to just and equitable resources, the lack of access to free and independent media. Our bodies are adorned with black to celebrate the female form and to draw on black as a symbol of mourning.On behalf of the Free West Papua Campaign and the people of West Papua, thank you so much indigenous Māori and Pacific women in Aotearoa New Zealand. Also, all supporters around the world for standing up for your suffering Melanesian brothers and sisters across the Pacific.With your help, West Papua never free from this illegal Indonesian occupation!FREE WEST PAPUAwww.freewestpapua.org/take-action/

kathleenjoy:

Pacific women rise up for a Free West Papua!

'Our freedom as indigenous Māori and Pacific women in Aotearoa New Zealand is inextricably bound up with that of our Pacific West Papuan brothers and sisters.'- Oceania Interrupted

http://urlmin.com/3hmy2

Our mouths are adorned with the Morning Star flag as symbol of enforced West Papuan silence. 

Our hands are bound to symbolise the lack of freedoms experienced by West Papuan people. 

Our voices and movement are restricted to symbolise the lack of freedom of expression of political opinion, the lack of access to just and equitable resources, the lack of access to free and independent media. 

Our bodies are adorned with black to celebrate the female form and to draw on black as a symbol of mourning.

On behalf of the Free West Papua Campaign and the people of West Papua, thank you so much indigenous Māori and Pacific women in Aotearoa New Zealand. 
Also, all supporters around the world for standing up for your suffering Melanesian brothers and sisters across the Pacific.

With your help, West Papua never free from this illegal Indonesian occupation!

FREE WEST PAPUA

www.freewestpapua.org/take-action/

Women Warriors: 5 Standout Indigenous Female Leaders in Canada by David P. Ball
Ellen GabrielMichele AudetteBuffy Sainte-MarieBridget TolleyEriel Deranger
Read more.

Women Warriors: 5 Standout Indigenous Female Leaders in Canada by David P. Ball

Ellen Gabriel
Michele Audette
Buffy Sainte-Marie
Bridget Tolley
Eriel Deranger

Read more.

"here we spend all this time trying to run from our past and the stories we knew and you girls are digging it all up again!" -my nookoum says jokingly, while talking again about her memories of being white-washed, living on her people’s land in fear and shame and of trying to “leave the native behind”.
I am told that people survive through their stories. My grandma tells me that we have stories to hear and stories to tell. 
-Amazing reflections from my warrior sister Emilee….

"here we spend all this time trying to run from our past and the stories we knew and you girls are digging it all up again!" -my nookoum says jokingly, while talking again about her memories of being white-washed, living on her people’s land in fear and shame and of trying to “leave the native behind”.


I am told that people survive through their stories. My grandma tells me that we have stories to hear and stories to tell. 

-Amazing reflections from my warrior sister Emilee….

"I thought to myself, that maybe our legs are thick because our ancestors had to be strong and close to the land, because our ancestors spent so much time on hunts or constantly on the move with the changing of the seasons. That maybe, just maybe, our ancestors needed legs like tree trunks to guide them through the land. I remembered that our arms fought rebellions and carried our babies while we worked. I remembered that our eyes are always small and crinkled because we know joy and laugh whenever the chance arrives."
"Walking, I am listening to a deeper way. Suddenly all of my ancestors are behind me. Be still, they say. Watch and listen. You are the result of the love of thousands."
Linda Hogan

Melina Laboucan-Massimo, member of the Lubicon Cree First Nation, discusses the impacts of the Tar Sands project on her family and her traditional territories. Melina shares about the significance of the land for her and the roots of her strength and knowledge. Melina points out that the Tar Sands is a critical issue not only for the Lubicon Cree but, for everyone; and that because of this, taking action should include alliance building.

keepcalmbeadon:

Flathead Indian Smoked Hand-Tanned Beaded Moccasins

keepcalmbeadon:

Flathead Indian Smoked Hand-Tanned Beaded Moccasins

clatterbane:

[Text: Stay red and remain strong] (via Elisa W - Google - Yes!’)

clatterbane:

[Text: Stay red and remain strong]

(via Elisa W - Google - Yes!’)

erynnemichelle:

WE ARE THE ‘UNINVITED’: BLUE DOTS AND THE FNEA
By INM CollectivePosted in - Actions on February 12th, 20149 Comments
Today, Métis artist Christi Belcourt launched an amazing online action to reclaim our voices, following last week’s controversial announcement on the First Nations Control of First Nations Education Act (FNEA). Here is her statement on the project:
In Alberta, security for the Harper/Atleo FNEA “announcement” marked people with yellow dots (for invitees and elders and those on an ‘approved list’) and they made people who were not on an approved list wear blue dots. There were about 30 who were escorted out before the feast and offered no food. My question is why would community members, from that territory who are coming to hear an announcement on education be required to wear the blue dots? And I started thinking that the blue dots represent the people who the government would arrest first, or would harass first, or doesn’t care about, or throughout history has considered the “rebels” for protecting land speaking out. Or even further, the blue dots are our people, the masses of people who are not able to influence decisions, our opinions and are on the margins of society, or we have been ignored or despised because of the harms that come to our lands and bodies.
Read more:
http://nationsrising.org/we-are-the-uninvited-blue-dots-and-the-fnea/

erynnemichelle:

WE ARE THE ‘UNINVITED’: BLUE DOTS AND THE FNEA

By Posted in - Actions on February 12th, 20149 Commentswarmspringswomen-header

Today, Métis artist Christi Belcourt launched an amazing online action to reclaim our voices, following last week’s controversial announcement on the First Nations Control of First Nations Education Act (FNEA). Here is her statement on the project:

In Alberta, security for the Harper/Atleo FNEA “announcement” marked people with yellow dots (for invitees and elders and those on an ‘approved list’) and they made people who were not on an approved list wear blue dots. There were about 30 who were escorted out before the feast and offered no food. My question is why would community members, from that territory who are coming to hear an announcement on education be required to wear the blue dots? And I started thinking that the blue dots represent the people who the government would arrest first, or would harass first, or doesn’t care about, or throughout history has considered the “rebels” for protecting land speaking out. Or even further, the blue dots are our people, the masses of people who are not able to influence decisions, our opinions and are on the margins of society, or we have been ignored or despised because of the harms that come to our lands and bodies.

Read more:

http://nationsrising.org/we-are-the-uninvited-blue-dots-and-the-fnea/